At many news organizations, “social media” has become an euphemism for citizen journalism.  something of a catch-all, a not especially descriptive term for highly differentiated functions. Editors think about social sharing as they’re assigning stories; writers use social channels to find sources and confirm leads; designers incorporate social media buttons and widgets into site redesigns; […]

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Universities around the world are teaching a relatively new subject – entrepreneurial journalism. The revolutionary changes reshaping journalism have driven the industry to search for new financial models and respond to marketplace demands. Journalism schools are part of that search: Their entrepreneurial-journalism programs try to identify new sustainable business models, create new journalism tools, teach […]

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When Adda Birnir joined the first class of the new entrepreneurial journalism program at the City University of New York in 2012, she thought she had a great idea for a new business: creating software that could optimize web content for a tablet. Four months later, Birnir launched her company, and it continues to this […]

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1. Use ‘Follow’ to Grow Your Audience Follow button on Facebook enables journalists to update readers and sources, while reserving personal updates for friends only. Whichever beat you cover, enabling Follow on your profile gives you the opportunity to share public photos, links and analysis about the latest news with your readers and viewers. Simply […]

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By Tom Prete It seemed like an opportunity too good to pass up, a chance for a young online startup to pounce on a news niche that has proven popular across the country but was virtually abandoned by one city’s legacy media. All across the United States, community newspapers and local websites alike seek readers […]

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by Phillip Smith (Bio), February 21, 2013 I’m working on a fun little project at the moment that involves pulling data out of a Google Spreadsheet that is being curated by a team of journalists. The interesting thing about this project is that it so clearly illustrates the difference in thinking between people who regularly […]

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By Robert Niles Can democratic communities survive without a newspaper to provide them the civic information they need? That’s the question on many journalists’ minds these days? But I think it more enlightening to flip that question, and ask again: Can newspapers survive without the communities they need to sustain them? That, I think is […]

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